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The voice of the student.

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The voice of the student.

The Wave

The full cast promo shot for MIAs production of Little Shop of Horrors. Photo Credit to Chris Dayett
A Look Behind the Curtain: The Production of a Musical
Logan Yarnell, News Editor • April 19, 2024

Musicals are a much-loved part of arts all around the world. From the Broadway stages in New York to small school auditoriums, ever since the...

Photo credit to Laura Chouette via Unsplash under Unsplash License.
The role of social media influencers in the world of marketing continues to grow.
The Rise of Social Media Influencers in Marketing
Jenna Golec, Staff Writer • April 18, 2024

Recently social media influencers have emerged into the marketing world. With large followings many social media influencers have found a way...

Photo credit to Anthony Delanoix via Unsplash under Unsplash License.
In an era succeeding a global pandemic, how have festivals and concerts adjusted?
Exploring Music Festivals In A Post-Pandemic Era
Skylar Siems, Staff Writer • April 18, 2024

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, musical festivals have undergone significant changes. Understandably, the pandemic has impacted nearly...

Photo credit to 
Rivage via Unsplash under Unsplash License.
There has been a recent surge in the popularity of retro gaming consoles.
The Resurgence of Retro Gaming: Exploring the Appeal of Vintage Consoles and Classic Games
Cade Scarnavack, Staff Writer • April 18, 2024

The Resurgence of Retro Gaming: Exploring the Appeal of Vintage Consoles and Classic Games In 1952, Cambridge professor Sandy Douglas released...

Photo credit to Sandro Schuh via Unsplash under Unsplash License. 
The mental health of athletes is a subject commonly overlooked.
Unveiling the Relationship Between Mental Health and Sports
Addison O, Staff Writer • April 18, 2024

Athletes confront a myriad of mental health challenges, ranging from anxiety and depression to eating disorders and substance abuse, largely...

Starliner Amidst Safety Concerns

The International Space Station is a base used by scientists to experiment the effects of orbit and better observe space. Image created in Canva.
Elle Richardson
The International Space Station is a base used by scientists to experiment the effects of orbit and better observe space. Image created in Canva.

A collaboration between NASA and Boeing has yielded progress towards another crewed spaceflight in May. This mission will send two NASA astronauts onboard the vessel CST-100 Starliner, Cutch Wilmore and Suni Williams, to the International Space Station before returning with them back to Earth eight days later. Two years earlier, the test mission of this vessel docked at the station uncrewed and returned successfully. 

The ship will improve the economic sustainability of the aerospace industry, as the same ship can be reused to shuttle astronauts rather than needing to build a new one for every mission. Reusing the ship is also supposed to limit the risk of disaster inherent with every new shuttle launch.  NASA’s commercial crew program manager Steve Stich was quoted stating, “We’re in really good shape,” in regards to the status of the shuttle. 

Yet like all good things, there is a catch. The CEO of Boeing and two other companies have officially stepped down from the company. In January, the door of a Boeing 737 Max plane blew out. According to the FBI, the nature with which the accident occurred may be a crime and is currently under investigation.

According to the ex-CEO Dave Calhoun, Boeing is notorious for inner company moral struggles. He stated that the pressures of constant production impact the performance quality of the products, leaving the impression on employees that the “movement of the airplane is more important than the first time quality of the product.

The president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Stan Deal, has also immediately retired. Yet January was not the only recent incident in which a Boeing product caused a serious accident. Two of its Max 8 jets had fatal crashes in 2018 and 2019.

The accident in 2018 occurred in October and resulted in the death of all 189 people on board after the plane crashed into the sea. The accident was a result of a miscalibrated angle-of-attack sensor. The accident in 2019 occurred as a result of a similar miscalibration of the angle-of-attack sensor and killed 157 passengers.

As a result of these incidents, all Boeing 737 Max planes were grounded by the President of the United States and then of other nations. Many blame Boeing for failure to address the problem during testing of the aircraft and even after the first crash. 

The Boeing 737 Max was only formally launched in May of 2017, which leaves many concerned about the current and future production of Boeing, which includes Starliner. Despite the involvement and testing of NASA, many are still concerned about instrument failure due to the recent track record of Boeing.

In response to these concerns, NASA has implemented a manual control system on Starliner in case of instrument failure. This would allow the astronauts on board to override the automated control system in case of emergency. 

According to Stitch, NASA is finalizing some of the certifications and adding more safety measures pending Starliner’s operational missions. Most in the aerospace industry are anxiously awaiting the formal launch of Starliner as it increases the reliability with which we can access the ISS. According to Boeing’s schedule, this could be as early as November 2024. There are mixed emotions in the aerospace industry over the shuttle, as it is already two years behind schedule and many are worried that the development is being rushed.

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About the Contributor
Elle Richardson
Elle Richardson, Executive Editor
Elle Richardson is a senior at Marco Island Academy and the Executive Editor for The Wave. She enjoys learning about space, sailing, and 70s music. Math and science are her favorite subjects, and she hopes to use them to pursue a career in aerospace engineering, hopefully at the University of Florida. When she's not at school or work, Elle enjoys sorting vinyl records and dragging her friends to sailing with her.
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