The voice of the student.

The Wave

Breaking News
The voice of the student.

The Wave

The voice of the student.

The Wave

Which Water Bottle Are You?
Which Water Bottle Are You?
Kacie Swanson, Staff Writer • February 23, 2024

What musical are you? Take this quiz to find out!
What Musical Are You?
Michael Martinez-Melara, Staff Writer • February 23, 2024

Which Season Are You?
Which Season Are You?
Cade Scarnavack, Staff Writer • February 23, 2024

Which Gemstone Are You?
Which Gemstone Are You?
Nicole Garcia-Pantoja, Staff Writer • February 23, 2024

morning-anouncements-art-club-a-frog-and-toadrt-club
Morning Announcements - 2/23/24
February 23, 2024

Announcements   Good morning Marco Island Academy, today is Friday, February 23rd, 2024,  and these are your morning announcements!...

Spiraling into Destruction: The Formation of Hurricanes

Hurricanes+are+dangerous+storms+that+cause+severe+damage+to+affected+areas.
Elle Richardson
Hurricanes are dangerous storms that cause severe damage to affected areas.

It’s September, the peak of Florida’s annual hurricane season. As more storms roll around, it is important to understand how they form. 

Most of Florida’s hurricanes originate in the Atlantic Ocean near the equator. Due to the region’s warm ocean and air temperatures, it serves as an ideal environment for them to form. As global temperatures continue to rise, so will the strength and frequency of these storms. Just this summer, ocean temperatures in the Florida Keys rose above 101 °F, setting a new record. This goes to show the impact that global warming is already having, and water temperatures are predicted to be even higher in years to come. 

In addition to temperature and climate, hurricane formation relies on the atmospheric pressure system. To keep it simple: cold air, generally under high pressure, sinks to the earth’s surface while warm air, generally under low pressure, rises. This phenomenon creates a pressure gradient, preventing air from remaining still. The extreme differences in air pressure present during storms can enhance this effect, causing all of the surrounding high-pressure air and moisture to be drawn into the core of the storm. This center of low-pressure air is commonly known as an eye. Under these circumstances, ordinary storms can potentially strengthen into hurricanes, creating high-speed winds and heavy precipitation. 

Free Hurricane Earth photo and picture
Photo via Pixabay under Pixabay License Hurricanes take the form of a rotating storm system that forms over warm waters.

After these storms strengthen along their paths they can pose new threats to coastal towns and cities. Aside from heavy winds and rainfall, hurricanes can cause other issues such as storm surges. As the storm winds blow across the ocean’s surface, they can displace a large amount of water, leading to a storm surge. Storm surges cause water to rise above seawalls, acting as a wave that adds water on top of the unusually high tides. Storm surges cause flooding that results in billions of dollars worth of damage to coastal homes and properties. Just last year Hurricane Ian brought storm surges of almost 14 feet to Fort Myers Beach. While coastal towns and cities like Fort Myers are generally built to withstand hurricanes, intense storms like Ian can cause catastrophic damage. 

Now, why do some hurricanes dissipate before they even make landfall? Hurricanes have one major weakness: cold temperatures. As hurricanes travel through cold waters, less water can evaporate and fewer clouds can form, ultimately weakening the storms. 

While it’s essential to be prepared for hurricanes, most weaken before they can cause damage. The best thing we can do is have a plan if one of these storms is projected to impact us.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Wave
$495
$1200
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will help support not only the student Journalism and Yearbook clubs at Marco Island Academy, but as well as any new equipment, club improvements, and annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
About the Contributor
Andres Rodriguez, Science Editor
Andres Rodriguez is a senior at Marco Island Academy and Science Editor for The Wave. In his free time, Andres likes to play tennis, spend time with friends, and go to the beach. After high school, Andres plans to go to college and study environmental engineering. 
Donate to The Wave
$495
$1200
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Wave Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *